In The News

Rivel Prism Webinar – Activism 2.0

On November 1st, Dave Bobker was joined by Jim Woolery, Head of M&A and Corporate Governance, King & Spalding, and Steve Frankel, Partner, Joele Frank, for a discussion on the latest developments on shareholder activism.

Activism 2.0: The New Paradigm

Jim and Steve provided a very insightful look at the strategy of investment funds, the evolving activism landscape and proactive steps for companies to take. We discussed the importance of open dialogue with investors on a growing number of topics, and the challenges many companies face in determining which investors to contact, how to gain an audience and how to assess relative strengths and weaknesses.

You can listen to the full presentation here: Activism 2.0: The New Paradigm

If you would like to receive a copy of the presentation, or discuss how your company can effectively engage investors on any of the issues discussed on the webinar, please contact Dave Bobker at dbobker@rivel.com.

Rivel Research Group Releases Largest Ever Global Investor Relations Compensation Study

Adding Board-level Engagement, Corporate Governance, Strategic Planning or M&A Advisory Activities Lead to Greatest Compensation Gains

San Diego, Calif. – Monday, June 26, 2017 – Rivel Research Group, a global leader in investor market research and analytics, today revealed the US portion of its latest corporate Investor Relations Officer (IRO) compensation data at its semi-annual conference held in San Diego. Extracted from a profile of 1703 global professionals, this study is unprecedented in its size and international reach.

Read More

Rivel Releases Unprecedented International Study on Guidance Showing Deep Concern over Consensus Earnings and Short-term Volatility

Public Management Teams Fear Clout Wielded by Data Aggregators; Board Has More Influence on Guidance in Europe vs. North America; Majority of IROs Have Strong Influence on Setting Guidance

NEW YORK, April 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Rivel Research Group, a global leader in investor market research and analytics, today revealed key findings from the largest global study of its kind on guidance. Between February and March 2017, Rivel conducted the guidance study among 976 North American and European companies, encompassing all market caps from small to mega cap.

Read More

Engaging with Institutional Sales Teams

In a recent report by Rivel Research Group…only 44 percent of respondents indicated that they directly market their story to institutional sales teams.

Download the article as a PDF document.

IR-Update-March-2017

Opinion: Big investors have a different take on CEO pay than Nobel-winning academic theories

By Brendan Sheehan

Investors think executive compensation has become increasingly disconnected from companies’ real performance

On Monday, the Nobel Prize for Economics was awarded to Oliver Hart and Bengt Holmström, two U.S-based professors. A significant section of their work focuses on how companies pay CEOs and senior executives, and their findings, along with many other academics, have contributed greatly to a significant shift in the design (and size) of CEO pay over the past few decades.

Yet while there have been many important advancements in understanding how compensation is linked to behavior, there are some significant disconnects among the academic theory (developed in part by the two Nobel laureates), its practical application and the opinion of investors.

What is often missing from conversations surrounding CEO pay is the opinion of the large, sophisticated investors who own significant holdings of most companies in the country. And they tell a different story from the academics.

Executive compensation has, in their eyes, become increasingly disconnected from the real performance of companies. While academic models suggest aligning management’s interest with those of shareholders through various applications of performance-based equity and options, many of these investors feel that modern pay structures overly favor CEOs and that many are able to garner outsize rewards compared with shareholders.

That many of them feel CEOs interests aren’t well aligned with their own is reflected in an increase in mainstream investors voting against CEO pay packages. For example, BNY Mellon voted against 38.4% of pay packages presented to it in 2016, and Calpers voted against 13.8%.

Read full article >